August MacGregor

Celebrating Sensuality. Intended for mature audiences, 18 and over


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Why I Write Erotic and Romantic Fiction

I originally wrote this by a request from Elizabeth over at Just Add Tea, and I wanted to add it here after reading Emmanuelle de Maupassant’s post “Why Write Erotic Fiction?” that offers a wonderful variety of voices (I reposted it yesterday).

First, a little background in how I got to the point where I’m writing erotic and romantic stories. Several years ago, I saw an online contest for erotic short stories. I was writing general fiction at the time, and I figured, Why not? It’ll be fun to try something new. I won an honorable mention, and that was soon followed by an invitation to join other authors in contributing to Ruthie’s Club, a subscription website that offered erotica — with each story accompanied with an original illustration at the beginning. I enjoyed being a part of the site, and many stories came out of that relationship.

Unfortunately, Ruthie’s Club shut down around 2010. That left all those stories no longer published — and a lot of ideas in my head for more stories.

Then I learned about this little thing called “self-publishing.” You mean I could prepare an ebook and put it up for sale on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Smashwords? I figured, Why not? It’ll be fun to try something new.

Yes, that’s a recurring theme for me. It drives part of my writing. Because stories can come in forms of fantasies that I want to see played out and see where they go. I imagine that scores of people have fantasies, and authors move those from their heads to the computer screen (or typewriter if you’re old school like that).

And sex scenes can be electric to write. Sometimes, my fingers can’t type fast enough to get the action out. Thank goodness I can type fairly well, and don’t have to hunt-and-peck — which would’ve driven me bonkers from impatience.

However, my writing is not just about the sex. (Okay, you got me: that part of storytelling is fun.) Deeply satisfying is writing about people connecting on emotional levels — not just physical. I’ve noticed that my writing in the past couple of years has come to include this. Before, I was pretty single-minded on writing about people simply enjoying pleasure. Now, though, the characters also enjoy togetherness. And that has broadened my writing to involve scenes besides sex.

In turn, that expanded my stories from only the erotica category to romance. Which is something I never saw coming. I read a mixture of stories, including general fiction, thrillers, and erotica. I don’t come from reading a vast library of romantic books. So I feel as a newbie in the field. (By the way, the romance that I’ve read which has probably stuck with me the most is The Lover by Marguerite Duras. An exquisite book.)

Relationships and emotions are complex, and I probably capture only a fraction of them in my stories. I’m fascinated by relationships and emotions, so there’s plenty for me to explore. My most recent novel is The Sweet Taste of Revenge, in which the main character divorces her cheating husband and plans to get revenge on him. That’s been an interesting challenge. I’m not a woman, nor have I been divorced. But in writing the book, I hope I was fair to the character. It was quite a ride.

Speaking of a ride, I suppose that’s the reasoning behind why I write. It’s the rush that I get when I take an idea and turn it into a story. That can be with an erotic and romantic story — or tamer stuff. I use August MacGregor as a pen name for the Rated Mature content and my real name for the rest. Writing is way too much fun to commit to only one type of story.

With my August pen name, I try to tell stories of people enjoying the sensual things in life and connecting with each other — but making mistakes along the way. I find that to be another part that brings interest to writing. Because things don’t always proceed perfectly. When a character is in love with someone, the second character may not feel the same way in return. People cheat in relationships. Not every couple has simultaneous orgasms that are mind-blowing every single time.

Which brings the hope that a story with people making mistakes is more interesting for the reader. Because I’d love for my stories to be a ride for readers, just like the stories were a ride to put together.

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Bowlful of Cherries

cherries by Walid Mahfoudh (Flickr)

Naked and bedded
they fed each other cherries

Pinching a stem and holding the cherry
as if bait for a tiger

Lips spread wide, teeth bared,
they plucked the fruit from its stem

(First, she tickled under each cherry
with her tongue tip because she loved his reaction)

They used to be careful of the cherry juice,
so it wouldn’t get on the white sheet

But they decided pink explosive stains on the sheets
would be good reminders of this afternoon

The rule was tossed aside, and
spraying cherry juice added to the sensual fun

Cherry and cherry, back and forth, feeding and teasing,
the sweet flesh delightful in their mouths

He moved the wide bowl from between them
to the nightstand

As it was time to feast on each other.

*****

Photo by Walid Mahfoudh (Flickr)


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Why Write Erotic Fiction?

Another tremendous post from Emmanuelle de Maupassant with quotes from various erotica authors, filled with their motivations to write. To bring issues from the shadows into the open. To arouse emotions in readers and engage them. There’s a garden of inspiration found in these quotes.

Emmanuelle de Maupassant

why write erotic fiction Emmanuelle de MaupassantSeveral months ago, I invited writers to ‘share their secrets’; 130 responded, writing honestly of their experiences – more about them here. It’s been a delight to see how various authors approach the writing process, and the manner in which we choose to focus our erotic lens.

As Adrea Kore reminds us, “Society is hungry for more ways to open up dialogue about sexuality – between women, and between men and women. Erotica, and the sharing and discussion that takes place around the reading of erotica, is one such conduit of dialogue.”

Erotic fiction can move us, disturb, confront and warm us. It compels an emotional, intellectual and visceral reaction.

While porn strikes a blow to the groin, erotic fiction adds an upper cut to the gut, wrenches the heart and arm-wrestles the mind. Erotic fiction follows protagonists not just in their pursuit of pleasure, but into the spaces…

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The Erotic Vein: the male pen

Emmanuelle de Maupassant did an outstanding service in collecting and presenting responses of erotica authors to her survey. In this post, she focuses on the views and experiences of male authors. Much to learn in here. A highlight for me was Terrance Aldon Shaw’s quote on why men should learn about sex from erotica rather than porn. A big thank you to Ms. de Maupassant for this post.

Emmanuelle de Maupassant

Several months ago, I put out a call to writers (of both genders) asking them to ‘share their secrets’. Well over a hundred responded, including around forty men (some wishing to remain anonymous). My thanks are extended to all who have given their time generously, and who have written so honestly.

I’ll be posting the results of this ‘grand survey’ over coming weeks, launching with thoughts from male writers. The issues touched upon here deserve further discussion; we hope that they inspire writers and readers alike.

As ever, your comments are welcome.

Arousing Intellect and Flesh

Most readers currently associate the erotic genre with ‘steamy romance’ and, often falsely, assume it to be the province of women writers alone. In fact, several of the respondents to this survey are successful male writers of what is usually classed as ‘women’s spicy fiction’.

Meanwhile, there is a whole strata of erotic fiction…

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