August MacGregor

Celebrating Sensuality. Intended for mature audiences, 18 and over


14 Comments

In That Song

it’s in hearing that song
that brings you back to the time
when you felt you lived
inside that song

its lyrics somehow
reflected what was going on
around you

the ache for things to be different
no matter how many prayers
your heart whispered,
they went unanswered

each prayer seeming more like
a shovel full of dirt
tossed to the side
to deepen the hole
in an attempt to bury your hopes

or maybe discover
water down there
to make a well

where you could stand
and listen to others
whisper down their prayers

you could softly answer
with that song
that wraps around them
and says the ache
is part of you

and it can help you treasure
the good times.

now the ache is a memory
among many memories
sweet and sad and precious
brought back by the melody

in that song.

Advertisements


2 Comments

Goonies Never Say Die

The Goonies, by Ben Northern (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Ben Northern (Flickr, Creative Commons)

“And that’s why books are never going to die. It’s impossible. It’s the only time we really go into the mind of a stranger, and we find our common humanity doing this. So the book doesn’t only belong to the writer, it belongs to the reader as well, and then together you make it what it is.”
― Paul Auster

Source: Goodreads
Click on illustration of The Goonies to jump to the illustrator’s (Ben Northern) Flickr page.


6 Comments

Consider Yourselves Warned, Muses

The Muse Calliope, by Eustache Le Sueur (Wikimedia Commons)

The Muse Calliope, by Eustache Le Sueur (Wikimedia Commons)

“Discipline allows magic. To be a writer is to be the very best of assassins. You do not sit down and write every day to force the Muse to show up. You get into the habit of writing every day so that when she shows up, you have the maximum chance of catching her, bashing her on the head, and squeezing every last drop out of that bitch.”
― Lili St. Crow

Source: Goodreads
Image above is The Muse Calliope, painted by Eustache Le Sueur (1650-1652). Calliope is the muse of epic poetry. Click on image to jump to this image’s Wikimedia Commons page.

Let’s listen to Homer as he invokes the Muse:

“Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns
driven time and again off course, once he had plundered
the hallowed heights of Troy.”

From The Odyssey, Book I, Robert Fagles translation (1996), quoted from Wikipedia.


3 Comments

Driving at Night

driving at night, by Jennifer Gaillard (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Jennifer Gaillard (Flickr, Creative Commons)

“E.L. Doctorow said once said that ‘Writing a novel is like driving a car at night. You can see only as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.’ You don’t have to see where you’re going, you don’t have to see your destination or everything you will pass along the way. You just have to see two or three feet ahead of you. This is right up there with the best advice on writing, or life, I have ever heard.”
― Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

Source: Goodreads
Click on image to jump to photographer’s Flickr page.


2 Comments

Persistence

clovers growing in crack of concrete, by photologue_np (Flickr, Creative Commons)

photologue_np (Flickr, Creative Commons)

“You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence.”
― Octavia E. Butler

Source: Goodreads
Click on image to jump to photographer’s Flickr page.


6 Comments

More Dramatic than a Goblin Army

spooky woods, by spodzone (Flickr, Creative Commons)

spodzone (Flickr, Creative Commons)

“If you want to write a fantasy story with Norse gods, sentient robots, and telepathic dinosaurs, you can do just that. Want to throw in a vampire and a lesbian unicorn while you’re at it? Go ahead. Nothing’s off limits. But the endless possibility of the genre is a trap. It’s easy to get distracted by the glittering props available to you and forget what you’re supposed to be doing: telling a good story. Don’t get me wrong, magic is cool. But a nervous mother singing to her child at night while something moves quietly through the dark outside her house? That’s a story. Handled properly, it’s more dramatic than any apocalypse or goblin army could ever be.”
― Patrick Rothfuss

Source: Goodreads
Click on image to jump to photographer’s Flickr page.


Leave a comment

Some Days, Writing Clicks Better than Others

drilling rock, by State Library Queensland (Flickr, Creative Commons)

State Library Queensland (Flickr, Creative Commons)

“There is no rule on how to write. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling rock and then blasting it out with charges.”
― Ernest Hemingway

Source: Goodreads
Click on image to jump to photograph’s Flickr page.