August MacGregor

Celebrating Sensuality. Intended for mature audiences, 18 and over


15 Comments

A Beginning

“Let love into your heart,”
she whispered.
“Life is much better with it. Trust me. Trust me on this one.”

His face rose,
from looking at his feet, to seeing her.

“Let yourself be vulnerable,”
she said softly.
“Let yourself be loved. And let yourself love someone else.”

She smiled at him. A smile of warmth,
light in the dark room.
“You’ve been alone for too long.”

He nodded. A gentle nod.
It wasn’t a lot, but she didn’t expect a lot.
It was a beginning.

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“I Want to Die While You Love Me” by Georgia Douglas Johnson

sun shining through trees, by Tony Armstrong (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Tony Armstrong (Flickr, Creative Commons)

I Want to Die While You Love Me

Georgia Douglas Johnson

I want to die while you love me,
While yet you hold me fair,
While laughter lies upon my lips
And lights are in my hair.

I want to die while you love me,
And bear to that still bed,
Your kisses turbulent, unspent
To warm me when I’m dead.

I want to die while you love me
Oh, who would care to live
Till love has nothing more to ask
And nothing more to give?

I want to die while you love me
And never, never see
The glory of this perfect day
Grow dim or cease to be!

*****

From The Book of American Negro Poetry (1922), edited by James Weldon Johnson. Source of poem: Poetryfoundation.org. The photo above is used under the non-commercial Creative Commons license. Click on image to jump to photographer’s Flickr page.


6 Comments

Piece by Piece

Piece by piece
of clothing
dropped to the floor.
Night by night
the clothing was shed,
to be picked up
the next morning
in less rushed times.

This shedding
was much more comfortable
than the shedding
of some of
the fortifications around his heart
as he shared
some of the
multitude of his emotions with her.

Lust,
she told him,
is easier than love.
But love is much deeper.
You are right to be careful with your heart.
And I will also be careful with it.


13 Comments

Forever and Ever Diamonds

diamond ring, by Tim S (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Tim S (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Diamonds,
the company wants us to know,
are forever.

And that’s true even when
the relationship has ended.

The jewel a sparkling reminder
of what once was.

And happily ever after
was not accomplished,
not this time.

But not all relationships
work out like fairy tales,
diamond marketing, and
romantic comedies.

Moments will sparkle
like that diamond
Moments will cut
like that diamond
Moments will fade away
Moments will last forever,
perhaps polished and multi-faceted,
like that diamond.

*****

The photo above is used under the non-commercial Creative Commons license. Click on image to jump to photographer’s Flickr page.


7 Comments

“A Love Song” by William Carlos Williams

abstract yellow and clouds, by webtreats (Flickr, Creative Commons)

webtreats (Flickr, Creative Commons)

A Love Song

William Carlos Williams

What have I to say to you
When we shall meet?
Yet—
I lie here thinking of you.

The stain of love
Is upon the world.
Yellow, yellow, yellow,
It eats into the leaves,
Smears with saffron
The horned branches that lean
Heavily
Against a smooth purple sky.

There is no light—
Only a honey-thick stain
That drips from leaf to leaf
And limb to limb
Spoiling the colours
Of the whole world.

I am alone.
The weight of love
Has buoyed me up
Till my head
Knocks against the sky.

See me!
My hair is dripping with nectar—
Starlings carry it
On their black wings.
See, at last
My arms and my hands
Are lying idle.

How can I tell
If I shall ever love you again
As I do now?

*****

From William Carlos Williams’s collection, Poems 1916. Source of poem: Poets.org. The photo above is used under the non-commercial Creative Commons license. Click on image to jump to photographer’s Flickr page.


6 Comments

In This Heart

In this heart,
in this beat
that thuds along by itself,
I am greatly fortunate
that I do not have to control it.
Otherwise, I may forget to
restart my heart after I have seen her
looking that way she does,
into the distance —
not considering a list of chores
or worries or planning something
but simply looking,
looking out into the wonder of the world.